Camden Church Steeple

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Composite Steeple Replacement

The latest testament that our abilities and capabilities are transferable and go way beyond boatbuilding.

We recently delivered a composite replacement of the 30-year old wooden spire as part of a complete steeple renovation of the Chestnut Street Baptist Church Camden, Maine.

  • The new 50’4” spire and brows is made of 3/8” solid FRP laminate using vinyl ester resin.
  • The outside finish coating is white NPG gelcoat.
  • Dimensions provided for the brows were double checked by Lyman-Morse to make the in-house drawings necessary for construction. Similar mold process of the steeple was used to build the brows and glassed to the spire.
  • One mold was made of the decorative scalloped shingles. The eight-sided steeple was divided into 4 quadrants. The four sections that included in-turning bonding flanges were pulled from this mold.
  • The four pieces were then bolted and bonded with a structural adhesive together by the flanges. Afterwards the outside seams were bonded across with a fiberglass trim piece forming the finished octagonal structure.
  • If weight is a consideration the process could include infusion thus eliminating excess weight. Being a high-end boatbuilder, Lyman-Morse is a leader in this process. The wooden steeple weighed more that 10,000 lbs. The new steeple weighs 6.880 lbs.
  • The spire was assembled at Lyman-Morse and trucked to the site. A crane lifted the 6,880 lb. spire and brows in place.
  • The project took 3 months to build.
  • The durability of the new steeple is expected to be at least 60+ years with little to no maintenance required. 
Lyman-Morse Composite Church Steeple

Lyman-Morse Composite Church Steeple

Length: 1m 35s

Description
  •    © Jon Linn
    The latest testament that our abilities and capabilities are transferable and go way beyond boatbuilding. We recently delivered a composite replacement of the 30-year old wooden spire as part of a complete steeple renovation of the Chestnut Street Baptist Church Camden, Maine.© Jon Linn
  •    © Mike Nile
    Steve Crane take measurements of 1968 wooden steeple.© Mike Nile
  •    © Mike Nile
    Steve Crane take measurements of 1968 wooden steeple.© Mike Nile
  •    © Mike Nile
    © Mike Nile
  •    © Mike Nile
    Original sections of steeple. We used these to make the mold.© Mike Nile
  •   
    Our draftsmen engineered drawings for construction of the molds for precision construction.
  •    © Samantha McPadden
    The new 504 spire and brows is made of 3/8 solid FRP laminate using vinyl ester resin.© Samantha McPadden
  •    © Samantha McPadden
    The new 504 spire and brows is made of 3/8 solid FRP laminate using vinyl ester resin.© Samantha McPadden
  •    © Samantha McPadden
    One mold was made of the decorative scalloped shingles. The eight-sided steeple was divided into 4 quadrants. The four sections that included in-turning bonding flanges were pulled from this mold.© Samantha McPadden
  •    © Samantha McPadden
    Similar mold process of the steeple was used to build the brows and glassed to the spire.© Samantha McPadden
  •    © Samantha McPadden
    Similar mold process of the steeple was used to build the brows and glassed to the spire.© Samantha McPadden
  •    © Samantha McPadden
    © Samantha McPadden
  •    © Samantha McPadden
    One mold was made of the decorative scalloped shingles. The eight-sided steeple was divided into 4 quadrants. The four sections that included in-turning bonding flanges were pulled from this mold.© Samantha McPadden
  •    © Samantha McPadden
    Similar mold process of the steeple was used to build the brows and glassed to the spire.© Samantha McPadden
  •    © marnie read
    The spire was assembled at Lyman-Morse and trucked to the site. A crane lifted the 6,880 lb. spire and brows in place. © marnie read
  •    © marnie read
    Our crane lifts the 6,880 lb. spire and places on brows. © marnie read
  •    © marnie read
    Our crane lifts the 6,880 lb. spire and places on brows. © marnie read
  •    © Mike Nile
    Crane lifts 6880 lb steeple in place.© Mike Nile
  •    © Mike Nile
    If weight is a consideration the process could include infusion thus eliminating excess weight. Being a high-end boatbuilder, Lyman-Morse is a leader in this process. The wooden steeple weighed more that 10,000 lbs. The new steeple weighs 6.880 lbs.© Mike Nile
  •    © Mike Nile
    Crane lifts 6880 lb steeple in place. The project took 3 months to build. The durability of the new steeple is expected to be at least 60+ years with little to no maintenance required.© Mike Nile
© Jon Linn

The latest testament that our abilities and capabilities are transferable and go way beyond boatbuilding. We recently delivered a composite replacement of the 30-year old wooden spire as part of a complete steeple renovation of the Chestnut Street Baptist Church Camden, Maine.© Jon Linn

© Mike Nile

Steve Crane take measurements of 1968 wooden steeple.© Mike Nile

© Mike Nile

Steve Crane take measurements of 1968 wooden steeple.© Mike Nile

© Mike Nile

© Mike Nile

© Mike Nile

Original sections of steeple. We used these to make the mold.© Mike Nile

Our draftsmen engineered drawings for construction of the molds for precision construction.

© Samantha McPadden

The new 504 spire and brows is made of 3/8 solid FRP laminate using vinyl ester resin.© Samantha McPadden

© Samantha McPadden

The new 504 spire and brows is made of 3/8 solid FRP laminate using vinyl ester resin.© Samantha McPadden

© Samantha McPadden

One mold was made of the decorative scalloped shingles. The eight-sided steeple was divided into 4 quadrants. The four sections that included in-turning bonding flanges were pulled from this mold.© Samantha McPadden

© Samantha McPadden

Similar mold process of the steeple was used to build the brows and glassed to the spire.© Samantha McPadden

© Samantha McPadden

Similar mold process of the steeple was used to build the brows and glassed to the spire.© Samantha McPadden

© Samantha McPadden

© Samantha McPadden

© Samantha McPadden

One mold was made of the decorative scalloped shingles. The eight-sided steeple was divided into 4 quadrants. The four sections that included in-turning bonding flanges were pulled from this mold.© Samantha McPadden

© Samantha McPadden

Similar mold process of the steeple was used to build the brows and glassed to the spire.© Samantha McPadden

© marnie read

The spire was assembled at Lyman-Morse and trucked to the site. A crane lifted the 6,880 lb. spire and brows in place. © marnie read

© marnie read

Our crane lifts the 6,880 lb. spire and places on brows. © marnie read

© marnie read

Our crane lifts the 6,880 lb. spire and places on brows. © marnie read

© Mike Nile

Crane lifts 6880 lb steeple in place.© Mike Nile

© Mike Nile

If weight is a consideration the process could include infusion thus eliminating excess weight. Being a high-end boatbuilder, Lyman-Morse is a leader in this process. The wooden steeple weighed more that 10,000 lbs. The new steeple weighs 6.880 lbs.© Mike Nile

© Mike Nile

Crane lifts 6880 lb steeple in place. The project took 3 months to build. The durability of the new steeple is expected to be at least 60+ years with little to no maintenance required.© Mike Nile

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